I seen the fire and then I seen all the girls rushing down to the place to escape.  So I tried to go through the Greene Street door, and there were quick girls there and I seen I can’t get out there, so I went to the elevator, and then I heard the elevator fall down, so I ran through to the Washington Place side, and I went over to the Washington Place side and there wasn’t any girls there, so I ran over the  doors and none was over there.  So I went over to the door.  I tried the door and I could not open it, so I thought I was not strong enough to open it, so I hollered girls here is a door, and they all rushed over and they tried to open it, but it was locked and they hollered “the door is locked and we can’t open it!”

Ethel Monick, 9th floor worker, age 16
Today is the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, the largest mass death in New York City until 9/11. The majority of the 146 victims were Jewish and Italian women, ages sixteen to twenty-three.

I seen the fire and then I seen all the girls rushing down to the place to escape. So I tried to go through the Greene Street door, and there were quick girls there and I seen I can’t get out there, so I went to the elevator, and then I heard the elevator fall down, so I ran through to the Washington Place side, and I went over to the Washington Place side and there wasn’t any girls there, so I ran over the doors and none was over there. So I went over to the door. I tried the door and I could not open it, so I thought I was not strong enough to open it, so I hollered girls here is a door, and they all rushed over and they tried to open it, but it was locked and they hollered “the door is locked and we can’t open it!”

Ethel Monick, 9th floor worker, age 16

Today is the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, the largest mass death in New York City until 9/11. The majority of the 146 victims were Jewish and Italian women, ages sixteen to twenty-three.