In addition to holding seances in various rooms of the White House, Mary Todd Lincoln also found herself drawn to spirit photography—this photo, taken by William H. Mumler, purports to show Mrs. Lincoln being watched over by her late husband.
Mumler was the target of much ire from P.T. Barnum and others who thought he was taking advantage of a grieving nation—demand for Mumler’s services shot up after the Civil War left many families missing at least one member, and he was put on trial for fraud in 1869. 

For another supernatural photo hoax from history, see “Sherlock Holmes in Fairyland”, an account of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Cottingley Fairies.

In addition to holding seances in various rooms of the White House, Mary Todd Lincoln also found herself drawn to spirit photography—this photo, taken by William H. Mumler, purports to show Mrs. Lincoln being watched over by her late husband.

Mumler was the target of much ire from P.T. Barnum and others who thought he was taking advantage of a grieving nation—demand for Mumler’s services shot up after the Civil War left many families missing at least one member, and he was put on trial for fraud in 1869. 

For another supernatural photo hoax from history, see “Sherlock Holmes in Fairyland”, an account of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Cottingley Fairies.