The first newspapers, dating from the dawn of the seventeenth century, took the names “gazette,” after the Italian gazetta, likely after the copper coin that was the price of the first Venetian papers, or “coranto”, with the promise of current events. Others took up names like “News” or “Relations”. More imaginative titles would soon be on offer: the Journal, the Record, the Morning, the Evening, the Times, the Press, the Post, the Telegraph, the Intelligencer, the Advertiser, the Tribune, the Sun, the World, the Mirror. The very names of the periodical press held the promise to inform, to announce, to instruct, and to reflect the world in all its complications.

Gregory Shaya, "The Myth of the Fourth Estate," new from our Roundtable blog

The first newspapers, dating from the dawn of the seventeenth century, took the names “gazette,” after the Italian gazetta, likely after the copper coin that was the price of the first Venetian papers, or “coranto”, with the promise of current events. Others took up names like “News” or “Relations”. More imaginative titles would soon be on offer: the Journal, the Record, the Morning, the Evening, the Times, the Press, the Post, the Telegraph, the Intelligencer, the Advertiser, the Tribune, the Sun, the World, the Mirror. The very names of the periodical press held the promise to inform, to announce, to instruct, and to reflect the world in all its complications.

Gregory Shaya, "The Myth of the Fourth Estate," new from our Roundtable blog